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Books by Jerry Wyant

Books by Jerry Wyant




Basic Economics for Students and Non-Students Alike






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Paperback $13.99
e-Book formats: $1.99


Book description:



I believe that you will find BASIC ECONOMICS FOR STUDENTS AND NON-STUDENTS ALIKE to be a useful resource: whether you are a student who finds the material easy to understand or a student who is having problems understanding one or more topics covered in your economics class; whether you are taking an introductory economics course or an intermediate-level course; whether you are studying economics because you are interested in the subject or because you are required to take the subject; whether you are a student at all or simply somebody who wants to understand economics; whether you are interested in further studies or if you simply want to become better-informed as a citizen, voter, political “junkie”, or somebody trying to keep up with current events; whether you are looking for a learning resource in addition to other resources or if you are looking for a primary resource; or if you are an educator who wants an inexpensive resource for your students to use for any of the above reasons.
You can use this book to learn the concepts involved in economics whether or not you are comfortable with the graphs, math, and statistics that people normally associate with economics. Graphs are not included, but both the graphs and the concepts behind them are explained; only basic math is included, and you can even skim over the math and still come away with an understanding of the concepts; statistics is not included at all.
BASIC ECONOMICS FOR STUDENTS AND NON-STUDENTS ALIKE is an easy way to learn concepts relating to economics and the economy. It is a product of thousands of hours spent online, teaching basic concepts in economics to hundreds of students worldwide over the course of the past several years. From back and forth communications, I have discovered the explanations for the concepts that students find easiest to understand, as well as the areas that most often get misunderstood and under-emphasized.
I have worked with students located throughout the United States and from many different countries, on six different continents; students from many different school systems with different points of emphasis; students with different levels of knowledge, different backgrounds, and different levels of interest in the subject. I have received numerous comments and testimonials regarding the teaching methods that I incorporate in BASIC ECONOMICS FOR STUDENTS AND NON-STUDENTS ALIKE.
The subject matter included in BASIC ECONOMICS FOR STUDENTS AND NON-STUDENTS ALIKE comes from a compilation of many different textbooks at the introductory and intermediate levels. My goal was to include every subject in economics that normally will be found in an introductory level textbook of economics, microeconomics, or macroeconomics. Since different school systems, different classroom instructors, and different textbooks cover a slightly different combination of topics, BASIC ECONOMICS FOR STUDENTS AND NON-STUDENTS ALIKE is a little more comprehensive than most single introductory textbooks of economics. Some of the topics will be found in introductory classes in some schools, but in intermediate-level classes in other schools.


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Purchase paperback version or Kindle version from Amazon.com


Purchase paperback version from CreateSpace.com (same price, but my royalties are higher)


Purchase e-Book version (Nook, Kindle, tablet, PC, etc.) from Smashwords.com


Purchase paperback version or Nook version from BarnesandNoble.com




Sanity and Public Policy: Separating Truth from Truisms




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List price:
Paperback $15.99
e-Book formats: $1.99


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We live in an era known as "The Age of Information". It would be more accurate to call it "The Age of Misinformation". The truth is there for the taking, but in order to find it we must know how to sift through all of the misinformation that surrounds it. How can we distinguish between what is factual, logical, and relevant, when the truth is blended in with so much misinformation? Do we take the time to research every claim, while at the same time leaving our biases behind while we consider every possibility, conduct a thorough cost and benefit analysis of policy choices, and decide each individual issue on its merits? Is it practical, or even possible, to do so? Who can we trust to even give us the truth? Many people trust truisms, or simplistic statements that get repeated ad nauseam until the statements create their own truth in people’s minds. Many people play political games with important public policy. Instead of trying to figure out the truth, they simply pick a side in the policy debates, and “root” for that side to win. No matter what the issue is, if the pundits of the side these people root for take a position on an issue, these people will also take the same position, no questions asked and no thorough thought process involved. A reliance on truisms for policy positions, and pundits for information, is the reason why our political culture has become so polarized. Here is one truth to consider: Advocates of political positions are NOT interested in having people know the whole truth. Their jobs are to convince you to be on their side of issues. The truth is either secondary, or not even considered. Where do you turn to in order to find the truth? Who can you trust? Can we turn to journalists for the truth? Many of those who pass as journalists today include their biases along with the "facts" in their "news" reports, either overtly or subconsciously. Many of them are not thoroughly knowledgeable in the issues that they cover. What about economists? There are good reasons why economists can be found to support just about any debatable position. Economists are trained to look at issues in an unbiased manner, and look at all relevant information thoroughly. But too many of them, especially the prominent ones, end up ignoring relevant information once they decide which “side” they support. Economists are human, too. More importantly, economists rely too much on theory and not enough on the real world aspect of issues. Almost all of the study of economics is based on theory. All economic theories are developed from a laboratory-like isolation of variables. This is accomplished through the use of assumptions that do not exist in the real world. Once the assumptions are lifted in order to get to the real world, economists tend to ignore or at least downplay the significance of the original assumptions. The more complex the theory, the more likely it becomes that these original assumptions will be misused in the conclusions. The real world is complex, and data can be found or manipulated to support many positions. Part of the problem for those who care about the truth is to figure out which data is relevant to the conclusions. Back to the question of “who can you trust”? The only real answer is for you to trust yourself. But how do you determine what is true, and what isn’t? I believe that the truth can only be found by ignoring the theories and the pundits, keeping your eyes and ears open for relevant information regardless of the source, treating each issue on its own merits, and thoroughly and rationally separating the truth from the misinformation. This doesn’t have to be something that is difficult or time-consuming. It takes learning a thought process that focuses on rationality and thoroughness. This book is designed to show how such a thought process works.


Links:


Purchase paperback or Kindle version from Amazon.com


Purchase paperback version from CreateSpace.com (same price, but my royalties are higher)


Purchase e-Book version (Nook, Kindle, tablet, PC, etc.) from Smashwords.com


Purchase paperback or Nook version from BarnesandNoble.com




Making Education Work






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Paperback $8.99
e-Book formats: $1.99


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What is a teacher? A teacher plays a key role in molding today’s children into tomorrow’s citizens and leaders. A teacher finds ways to inspire different people who have different abilities, different needs, different life experiences; all without having the ability to choose which students to teach, or even how many. A teacher is motivated to make a positive difference while knowing that most of the important differences won’t be noticeable for many years; knows that many people will never recognize these contributions. A teacher accepts society’s problems in the form of raw materials to work with, and then receives blame for these problems. Despite this, and often because of this, a teacher is one of the first to be hit when budgets are cut. A teacher is someone who is a scapegoat for society's problems. A teacher is somebody who is underpaid. A teacher is someone who is underappreciated. Despite all of this, teachers teach because they care. Teachers teach because they can make a difference. Teachers teach because they know that our children and our future are at stake. Because of this, teachers are willing to settle for less than they could get in other professions: less in terms of compensation; less in terms of respect. Teachers are also human beings. They can only put up with so much before they consider a different profession, no matter how much they care. Did you ever have a teacher who inspired you to be more than you thought you could be? What did that teacher do to inspire? Was it something that a standardized test could expose? Teachers play a vital role in all of society. They deserve our appreciation; they do not deserve to be treated as scapegoats for all of society’s problems. Testing is important, but tests alone do not measure the value of a teacher. The value that an education system adds to society cannot be measured by corporate profits. The goals of corporations are not compatible with the goals of the education system.


Links:


Purchase paperback or Kindle version from Amazon.com


Purchase paperback version from CreateSpace.com (same price, but my royalties are higher)


Purchase e-Book version (Nook, Kindle, tablet, PC, etc.) from Smashwords.com


Purchase Nook version from BarnesandNoble.com




Even Great Doctors Make Mistakes




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Paperback $12.99
e-Book formats: $2.99


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Doctors are only human. A patient may think he or she has a great doctor who is incapable of making a mistake. But we all need to be vigilant. Even great doctors make mistakes. It is not comforting to know that our doctors are capable of making mistakes. Our livelihoods, even our lives, are at stake. We need to have faith in the medical professionals who are entrusted with our lives. And we can, with vigilance. We can trust our great doctors. It’s just that the faith we place in our doctors shouldn’t be blind. On the other hand, we need to do something if we lack faith in our medical professionals. If possible, we can switch doctors, to somebody we have faith in. Or perhaps our lack of faith stems from a lack of understanding. Perhaps, in many cases, only communication between patients and doctors needs to be improved. What do we do when doctors make mistakes? What do we do when doctors, nurses, and even receptionists in medical offices treat us with disrespect? How do we distinguish a great doctor from a bad doctor? I am a typical medical patient. I have no more knowledge of medical care than the average patient. But I do have quite a bit of experience at being a patient. Here are the lessons I have learned, and the questions that remain – along with the horror stories behind the lessons and questions.


Links:


Purchase paperback or Kindle version from Amazon.com


Purchase paperback version from CreateSpace.com (same price, but my royalties are higher)


Purchase e-Book version (Nook, Kindle, tablet, PC, etc.) from Smashwords.com


Purchase paperback or Nook version from BarnesandNoble.com




Common Misconceptions of Economic Policy

Debunking Politically-charged and Emotionally-charged Assertions







List price:
Paperback $15.99
e-Book formats: $2.99


Book description:



In this book, you will find essays on common misconceptions in topics such as taxes; unemployment; inflation; income inequality; deficits and debt; Social Security; welfare; and the roles that market forces, corporations, and the government play in the economy.


I do my best to write about economics in language that is easy to understand for everyday citizens - those who are unfamiliar with or uncomfortable with the language of economics. The essays in this book have been written with such a reading audience in mind. My hope is that if you have reading comprehension skills, you can understand what I am trying to say, even if you tend to shy away from the subject of economics.


I am not using this book as a platform to use political labels and political talking points in order to make political statements based on a predetermined political position. My agenda is to use truth and logic in order to debunk such statements. People will find that the conclusions I reach tend to fall towards the progressive – rather than the conservative – end of what the political spectrum has become in modern times. I already know that many people who blindly follow conservative talking points will see my conclusions and denounce what I have to say, based solely on a liberal label that they attach to me, with no regard for the actual points I make. This happens all the time. They can’t – or at least they choose not to – logically rebut the actual points being made. Instead, they commit several logical fallacies (Section 12 of this book) through a personal attack. But they are not alone. On those occasions when my conclusions don’t coincide with commonly-held liberal positions, I get the same treatment from those who blindly follow liberal talking points.


I have found that the truth does not lie on the side of anybody’s talking points. I have also found that the truth cannot be found by making an attempt to balance opposing talking points. The truth can only be found through an unbiased search for the truth. That truth is rarely found straight down the center. I have concluded that it is dishonest as well as illogical to tailor an argument so that it agrees with the left, the right, or the center. The truth is what it is, regardless of labels.


This book is a follow-up to Sanity and Public Policy: Separating Truth from Truisms, by Jerry Wyant.


Links:


Purchase paperback version from Amazon.com


Purchase paperback version from CreateSpace.com (same price, but my royalties are higher)


Purchase Kindle version from Amazon.com


Purchase e-Book version (Nook, Kindle, tablet, PC, etc.) from Smashwords.com




Author: 
Jerry Wyant
Date: 
2015-09-12
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